Are you a foodie looking for gluten-free recipes, maybe something for snacking, like granola bark? Rejoice! Elizabeth Prueitt’s new cookbook, Tartine All Day: Modern Recipes for the Home Cook, is a treasure trove utilizing non-wheat flours to create chef-quality meals at home. The book is not billed as a gluten-free book, nor is the famed bakery its author started touted as a gluten-free zone. But, pastry chef Prueitt, half of the husband-and-wife duo that founded San Francisco’s famed Tartine Bakery and Cafe has discovered over the years that she is gluten-sensitive and better off avoiding most wheat flour products. (The exception: breads made with naturally fermented bread, such as those her husband, baker Chad Robertson, is known for.) The new book, her third, is a collection of recipes the couple makes at home, including many subbing non-wheat flours made with other grains, legumes, nuts and even coconut for wheat flour in recipes for breakfasts (such as muffins, waffles and coffee cake); fried chicken (breaded with chickpea flour and potato starch); and über-delicious sweet baked treats (cakes, cookies and cobblers) you’d expect from a James Beard Best Pastry Chef-award winner (a distinction she won in 2008 in tandem with Robertson), and yes (!) snacky stuff such as granola bark.

Along with this, Prueitt includes details of apps, sauces, salad, entrees and sides based on the bounty the California agricultural scene has to offer. From simple sauce recipes to complex, multi-page instructions for homemade ricotta cheese and holiday turkey, the book offers insights for any cook interested in sophisticated cooking based on high-quality ingredients.

Tartine All Day; Modern Recipes for the Home Cook (Lorena Jones Books/Ten Speed Press; $40) is available on Amazon.com. 

Here’s a sample recipe from the book, Granola Bark, a treat Prueitt tested on her daughter, Archer:

GRANOLA BARK

Photo credit: Paige Green – Copyright 2017

Makes about 16 servings (one 13 by 18-inch/33 by 46cm sheet)

I have been auditioning granola bars for Archer, and I finally decided to make something in between the snack and the cereal: granola bark, a granola that forms a thin bar, and then is easily broken into smaller pieces. Two recipes come to mind as those that shock home cooks the first time they make them: mashed potatoes, for how much cream and butter is used, and granola, which also has a surprising amount of fat and much more sugar than expected in a healthful snack or breakfast. So I’ve cut back, opting for the lower-glycemic sweeteners like maple syrup and coconut sugar. I use olive oil, but other healthful fats, like coconut oil, would do just as well, and of course, butter is a delicious option. The egg white and plumped flax seeds help bind the granola and make it extra crispy, doing the job that additional sweetener often does. I enjoy this bark over yogurt with fruit for breakfast, and I include it in Archer’s lunchbox as a snack bar.

 

– The recipe works without the egg white, but the bark is slightly more crisp with the egg white.

1 and 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

3 cups/300g rolled oats (not quick-cooking)

1 and 1/4 cups/175g almonds, chopped

1 and 1/4 cups/60g unsweetened shredded coconut

1/2 cup/80g flax seeds or chia seeds, whole or ground

1/4 cup/35g sesame seeds

1/2 cup/60g almond flour or hazelnut flour

Combine the cinnamon, oats, almonds, coconut, flax or chia seeds, sesame seeds, and almond flour or hazelnut flour in a large bowl.

 

Preheat the oven to 325°F/165°C. Line a 13 by 18 inch/33 by 46cm rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
1/2 cup/120ml maple syrup or honey, or 1/4 cup/60ml of each

1/2 cup/75g coconut sugar

1/4 cup/60ml water

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp sea salt

 

Combine the maple syrup or honey or a mix of both, coconut sugar, water, vanilla, and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar and salt. Remove from the heat and let cool to warm room temperature.
1/3 cup/80ml olive oil or vegetable oil

1 large egg white, whisked until frothy

 

Add the olive oil and egg white to the cooled syrup mixture and whisk to incorporate. Pour over the oats mixture and mix well.
Spread the mixture evenly across the prepared baking sheet. Using another same-size baking sheet or the bottom of a pot, press the mixture down firmly to compact it before baking. Bake for 45 minutes or longer, until dark golden brown, rotating the sheet after about 15 minutes to promote even browning. While the granola bakes, open the oven door a couple of times to release steam.
Set the baking sheet on a cooling rack until the surface of the granola is crisp. Leave the oven on. If the surface is still tacky to the touch once it has cooled, return the pan to the oven and continue baking for another 10 to 15 minutes, checking every 5 minutes. Don’t let the bark get too dark, or it’ll taste bitter.
Once cool, break the bark into pieces and store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks, or in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

“Reprinted with permission from Tartine All Day: Modern Recipes for the Home Cook by Elisabeth Prueitt, copyright © 2017. Published by Lorena Jones Books/Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.” Photography credit: Paige Green © 2017

For another delicious recipe, check out this Versatile Egg Frittata.

 

 

 

 

 

Related Post

About The Author

Valerie Jarvie

Avid cook and traveler Valerie Jarvie specializes in food, lifestyle, and real estate writing for publications, online outlets, and consumer-oriented corporate clients. A former editor of the Dallas/Fort Worth Zagat Restaurant Survey and a credentialed sommelier, she is a frequent contributor to newspapers, luxury market magazines, and award-winning digital platforms.