Quantcast
Types of Leadership Styles
Leadership Growth

Why Leadership Style Matters – McKinsey’s 9 Leadership Behaviors

Women as a whole lead differently than do men, and this is good news for the future of business. Business cultures since the start of capitalism has been designed according to male norms – understandably, because until the 1960’s, women were not seen in positions other than secretary, teacher and nurse. Since then, several modern phenomena[1] have converged to open the door to the possibility of women’s equal participation in business and all other professions. It is imperative for women in leadership to understand different types of leadership styles, which ones come more naturally to women, and to choose the right style for the situation. In this way, we will influence the organizations we run to be more humane, more effective and produce better results.

Different types of leadership styles create the culture, or personality, of the organization, which in turn, affects the profitability and effectiveness of the company[2]. A high performance culture that is caring of and empowering to employees has been shown to produce better financial results. The tenets of Conscious Capitalism acknowledge that “Conscious Leadership” is one of four building blocks of a conscious organization[3]. The other three tenets are a higher purpose, stakeholder integration and conscious culture. Furthermore, McKinsey’s Women Matter report[4], produced annually by the global management consultancy, identifies nine leadership behaviors that contribute to an organization’s success and financial results. Of the nine, five are utilized more often by female leaders. Leadership behavior affects both culture and the effectiveness of the company.

Do you want to want to build the culture and financial success of your company? Read on to learn about the nine leadership behaviors that will help you do that.

McKinsey’s 9 Effective Leadership Behaviors

The following are the nine McKinsey leadership behaviors that improve organizational performance, listed in order of frequency used. Read through the list and rate the frequency with which you use each behavior.

 

Leadership Behavior: Frequency of my use:      
  Never Rarely Sometimes Often
1. Participative decision making by seeking team participation        
2. Role modeling that builds respect        
3. Inspiring employees by presenting a compelling vision        
4. Defining expectations clearly and rewarding achievements        
5. People development, or spending time teaching & mentoring team members        
6. Intellectual stimulation by encouraging risk taking and creativity
7. Efficient communications that are clear and compelling
8. Individualistic decision making that then encourages others to implement them
9. Control and corrective action, or holding people accountable to expectations

Significantly, the first five leadership behaviors are more commonly used by women than by men.

What stands out about this list is the inclusion of two decidedly different decision-making styles: both participative and individualistic decision-making. Participative is listed first as the most effective decision-making style, but individualistic also makes the cut. That indicates that both styles are effective, but must be used in the right circumstance. As a general rule, participative decision making is most effective in building a positive work environment, but it demands more consultation and time than unilaterally making a decision. In some situations, you don’t have time to seek participation or can’t encourage it because of the sensitive nature of the decision.  Emergency situations demand an individualistic decision-making behavior, but strategic and procedural issues are good candidates for inviting participation.

Interestingly, men demonstrate both individualistic decision-making and control and corrective action behaviors more often than do women. Combined, these characteristics create the traditional command-and-control management environment, in which employees are expected to obey the rules created by the boss and can expect punishment if they don’t. Notice that the McKinsey report doesn’t discourage the use of these behaviors, but encourages them in moderation and the appropriate situation. Women leaders need to understand that always being “nice”, avoiding confrontation and not holding employees accountable are not effective approaches to building a high performance team. Again, knowing when to use each leadership style is the key to high performance as a boss.

Women managers, learn to choose a leadership style that suits the situation and experiment with styles that are uncomfortable to you. Embrace your natural leadership strengths!


[1] Including the availability of the birth control pill, the civil rights and equal rights movements and governmental legislation.

[2] Kotter & Heskett

[3] Mackey & Sisodia, Conscious Capitalism.

[4] McKinsey, Women Matter 2007.

Did you like this article? Sign up (it's free!) and we'll send you great articles like this every week. Subscribe for free here.

Related Posts

knotted scarf - ways to wear a scarf
mentor
women over 50
Women supporting women Group of businesswomen in an office smiling
Business innovation colleagues brainstorming while sitting together at an office table
5 Tips for Embracing Change
Glass Ceiling Effect
Intuitive Decision Making
Leadership Communication Feature
leadership qualities
burnout
PrimeWomen Award