MinimalisticIt’s spring! Happy April! A topic that comes up around this time of year is spring cleaning and getting organized. Some people choose minimalism. I have been thinking about this spring cleaning effort, and about what a chore this will be, and once again consider being a minimalist, myself. When we moved last year, the downsizing task was huge. It didn’t turn out the way I thought or prepared for. But it was a relief to be free of the weight that furniture and belongings have on you.

My mother and father were products of the Depression. They bought things once, took care of them, and everything had a place;, but you never got rid of anything. Jars, bags, etc. were things you saved. It’s interesting how economic times influence people.

Benefits of Minimalism

Allergies are a common concern. The more clutter one has, the more dust accumulates, which means more dusting, vacuuming and less time to do what you want and need to do. If you don’t like cleaning, a one-way ticket to cleaning less is having fewer belongings. An organized and less cluttered space provides for a calmer state of mind, as well. There are those that believe that all things have energy. The more clutter in a room, the more energy, negative or positive, that collects. Having less clutter lets energy flow. Being a minimalist also saves time. When there is less, it’s easier to organize, and when everything has a place, it saves time because you know where to find things. You aren’t looking for your keys, bus pass or what-have-you.

Game PlanGame Plan

I’ve found that the easiest way to organize is to set aside two boxes. “Donate” and “trash.” Start going through the rooms, moving in a circular motion around the room. I sorted through trash, donation items and things I wanted to keep, moving in a clockwise direction until the room was complete and I had significantly decreased the clutter. In making the decision of what to keep, I looked at each item and asked myself if they were one of a kind pieces that could not be replaced. If so, I kept them. I also kept in mind that my daughters might want some of the items. If your children are out of the house, give them the items now instead of waiting until you’re gone. There is always donation to an organization or to a friend, as well. This way, it’s not overwhelming.

While going through items, I really tried to remain detached. We can sometimes become emotionally attached to items and belongings that we don’t truly need. It’s better to mentally take three steps back, so to speak, before making a decision regarding “need.”

The “how” is not always an easy thing to do. It helps to have a friend come over to help clear out the clutter and provide moral support. A second opinion is good, too. There are also companies that will come in and help clean out the clutter. There is no need to rush into it. For some, it’s like parting with history, their history, and that can be difficult. There’s more to downsizing than meets the eye. In my case, I wish I would have done it sooner.

Let us know if you are ready for spring cleaning and if you’ll be having a go at being a minimalist! Don’t forget – if you clean out a room, send us a photo on Facebook or Instagram with before and after. We can have a community of support for this year’s spring cleaning!

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About The Author

Tracey Lamont

Tracey Lamont, originally born and raised in Lubbock, Texas, is the mother of two daughters, an inventor, business owner and author. She has performed on The Strip, wrote and published a song, worked in three major hotels in Las Vegas, Nevada, and opened her own linen company for 16 years. Tracey also enjoys coffee, food and loves hanging out with her Jack Russell Terrier, Jacqui, currently in St. Louis.